NFPA 921 – 18.3.2 High-Order Damage

NATIONAL STANDARDS NFPA 921 – 18.3.2 High-Order Damage “The terms low-order damage and high-order damage are preferred to characterize explosion damage…   High-order damage is characterized by shattering of the structure, producing small, pulverized debris. Walls, roofs, and structural members are splintered or shattered, with the building completely demolished. Debris is thrown great distances, possibly hundreds of feet. High-order damage is the result of rapid rates of pressure rise.”   We see all signs of “high-order damage” in all three building collapses    
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NFPA 921-14.3 Preservation of the Fire Scene and Physical Evidence

NATIONAL STANDARDS: NFPA 921 – 14.3 “Preservation of the Fire Scene and Physical Evidence” “..the cause of a fire or explosion is not known until near the end of the investigation. Therefore, the evidentiary or interpretative value of various pieces of physical evidence observed at the scene may not be known until, at, or near the end of the fire scene examination, or until the end of the complete investigation. As a result, the entire fire scene should be considered physical evidence and should be protected and preserved.”   NIST INVESTIGATION: NIST states that they used no physical evidence in
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NFPA 921 – 9.3.6 Spoliation of Evidence

NATIONAL STANDARDS: NFPA 921 – 9.3.6 Spoliation of Evidence. “Once evidence has been removed from the scene, it should be maintained and not be destroyed or altered until others who have a reasonable interest in the matter have been notified. Any destructive testing or destructive examination of the evidence that may be necessary should occur only after all reasonably known parties have been notified in advance and given the opportunity to participate in or observe the testing.”   NIST INVESTIGATION: NIST states that they used no physical evidence in their investigation From NIST’s FAQ page: FAQ 28. NIST’s entire investigation
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